Health

Boy Dies of Ebola in Liberia, First Such Fatality in Months

MONROVIA, Nov 24 – A 15-year-old boy has died of Ebola in Liberia, the first such fatality for months in a country declared free of the disease in September, chief medical officer Francis Kateh said on Tuesday. Nathan Gbotoe tested positive last week and died late on Monday in hospital in Paynesville near the capital,

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U.N. Report Shows Worsening U.S. Maternal Mortality Rate

By Tom Miles GENEVA, Nov 12: Women are twice as likely to die from causes related to pregnancy or childbirth in the United States than in Canada, a new global survey of maternal mortality published by the United Nations and the World Bank showed on Thursday. The United States was also one of only 13

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Sierra Leone Celebrates End of Ebola Epidemic

FREETOWN (Reuters) Residents of Sierra Leone’s capital held a candlelit vigil and celebrations overnight to mark the end of an Ebola epidemic that has killed almost 4,000 people including more than 200 health workers since it began last year. Following 42 days with no new cases, the West African nation’s epidemic will be declared officially

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The Cost Of War

Health needs in conflict zones must be addressed BY Dr. Ala Alwan www.twitter.com/WHOEMRO Prior to the current conflict in Syria, immunization rates in the country were among the highest in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. More than 90 percent of Syrian children were vaccinated against diseases like measles and polio and there was no incident of

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#FreeBacon Topic Sizzles on Social Media after WHO Meat Report

NEW YORK (Reuters) Bacon lovers took to social media on Tuesday to express disdain over a World Health Organization report that said processed meat is likely to cause cancer. The hashtags #FreeBacon, #Bacongeddon and #JeSuisBacon were among the top-trending topics worldwide on Twitter for a second straight day. Celebrities, politicians and ordinary consumers were reacting

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Clinical Racism

Why some of the world’s most important medications don’t work for minorities BY Lindsey Konkel   Minutes separated Are’Yana Hill from death as she struggled to breathe in the hallway of her San Francisco high school. The 18-year-old had lived with asthma attacks since before she could talk, and on that day, in April 2014, she

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Of Hope, and of IVF

One woman’s story of her struggle to conceive BY Jumana Al-Darwish In solitude, I await my turn calmly. I am in a state of trance. I sit staring out of the blinds in my hospital room. There’s not much longer to go; in less than 20 minutes, the miracle of science will allow three embryos

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From Breakfast in Styrofoam to Styrofoam for Breakfast

To rid the world of plastic dishware, the worm’s the word By Stav Ziv More than 1 million tons of plastic foam cups and plates—most made of polystyrene resin—were discarded in the U.S. in 2013, says the Environmental Protection Agency, and the stuff can languish in landfills for many years. But there may be a

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Arm Mole Count Can Indicate Skin Cancer Risk: Study

People with more than 11 moles on their right arm have a higher-than-average risk of developing skin cancer, according to research published in the British Journal of Dermatology on Monday. Researchers from King’s College London found that counting the number of moles on someone’s right arm can be used to accurately estimate how many moles

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Scottish Nurse Suffering Ebola Complications Shows Improvement

Scottish nurse Pauline Cafferkey has been upgraded to “serious but stable” condition after suffering complications related to the Ebola virus. The 39-year-old was first diagnosed with Ebola in December 2014 after helping treat those suffering from the disease in Sierra Leone. She was treated for a month at that time. The complications began earlier this

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