On the Cover

The Egyptian Greetings From Tourism Board

Arbitrary detentions, torture, repression of the press and a failing economy have made Egypt a tinderbox By Janine di Giovanni Photographs by Vinciane Jacquet The day I arrived in Egypt in April, President Abdel-Fattah El Sisi had just given two Red Sea islands, Tiran and Sanafir, to King Salman of Saudi Arabia, who was visiting Cairo to announce billions

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Our Man In London?

Sadiq Khan’s herculean challenge is to unite a capital riven apart by bigotry By Sunny Hundal For a site that has served as a historical symbol of christian influence for over a thousand years, Southwark Cathedral in central London took on a new meaning this week. Standing next to a large table where Bishops offer

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Palestine: Childhood Lost

Dima Al Wawi made history as the youngest Palestinian prisoner to be held by Israel but despite the trauma, she’s keen to find a semblance of normalcy     By Maher Abukhater It took 12-year-old Dima Al Wawi’s parents some serious persuasion to get their daughter to talk. But even then, Dima would only utter a few

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UAE: Meet the World’s Youngest Minister

UAE’s youth minister Shamma Al Mazrui on the challenges she faces and how she is building bridges between her generation and the government By Leila Hatoum EARLIER this year in February, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) Vice President and Prime Minister, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum appointed Shamma Al Mazrui as the country’s youth

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Saudi Arabia: In The Driver’s Seat

Obama’s making nice. But it may not be enough to salvage his track record in the Gulf By Dr. Abdulkhaleq Abdulla At the beginning of his first term, U.S. President Barack Obama’s regional tour targeted Egypt in 2009, just one year prior to the outbreak of the Arab Spring. He wanted to engage in dialogue

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Somalia: Hope Springs

Drought-hit Somalia reaches a tipping point By Sagal Abshir Fatima Jibrell’s bleak outlook is evident. “We have no drinking water in Badhan today.” For the pastoralists of Somalia, only dirty, expensive water is for sale, brought in over dirt roads by truck in the scorching heat. Not a single one of the four boreholes in

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Yemen: War-Zone Babies

Yemen’s one-year conflict takes a toll on newborns By Charlene Rodrigues One Thursday in February, Rasha Al Shwafi began to feel sick. Heavily pregnant with twins, she initially passed it off as a mild indigestion. But as the day wore on, she found that she could no longer endure the pain. Still some weeks away

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Pakistan: Lahore Mourning

The fight against terrorism is yet to be won By Feisal Naqvi Lahore is no stranger to tragedy. Since 2004, there have been more than 30 major terrorist attacks in Pakistan’s second-largest city, which harbors its largest Christian population. But Sunday’s suicide blast which killed more than 70 people and injured 300 still came as

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Yemen: The Abandoned Animals of Taiz

Yemen’s animals have few protectors. Some are even in danger of extinction By Nasser Al Sakkaf THE citizens of Yemen’s Taiz city have been dealt many blows in recent months. Conflict, hunger, isolation and struggle dominate the city’s streets. But they are not the only ones affected by the conflict, which escalated in March 2015.

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Turkey: Gagged

Turkey has taken aim at its own press. But they are not taking it lying down By Aysegul Sert Right now Turkey’s global importance as a democratic power is on shaky ground. Any media that are deemed critical of the government are censored. Journalists who object the escalating erosion of civil and human rights and

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