December 23rd Issue

Unmasked Happiness

Faced with an uncertain future, refugees in camps and shelters need laughter to remind them of hope By Mostapha Raad They say laughter is the best medicine. It may not be a medicinal cure for those suffering from certain psychological ailments, but it alleviates the pain of those who have endured the trauma of war. To that end, laughter is as necessary as food, water and shelter. For the large number of Syrians who fled their homeland since war erupted nearly five years ago, and have been living in conditions ripe with frustration, desperation and no semblance of normalcy, laughter offers a ray of light. This story does not examine the hardships refugees face—whether it is defying the cruelties of war, or surviving the unforgiving nature of blizzards and the scorching summer heat alike, which have taken the lives of thousands. Instead this piece aims to restore faith in humanity, where humane interaction may be a gre (Read More)

Inside Cover

Features

An Unusual Christmas Carol

The Israeli occupation is leading to the exodus of Palestinian Christians from their most sacred site By Maher Abukhater Christmas…

Pakistan’s Girl Friday

Mahira Khan’s big-screen portrayals cross the Indo-Pak divide   BY Zahir Janmohamed with additional reporting by Sonal Shah   At…

Dancing with Daesh

Former Baathists are backing out of their dalliance with the terrorist militia BY Suadad Al Salhy On June 6, 2014, when…

Fed Is Data Dependent Now

As Dollar Index remains within the same tight margin, it’s best to sit and watch BY Nouraldin Al Hammoury The…

DOWNTIME

Mafia Politics

Jean-Pierre Filiu’s new book examines the relationship between the Arab “deep states” and the jihadis they sponsored BY Robin Yassin-Kassab…

One Flew Over

Zip-Lining, Dubai-style By Anna Yazijyan  “Five…four…three…two…one…” With every second closer to the jump, adrenaline filled every cell of my body,…