February 24th Issue

Weaponizing Global Finance

A new U.S. law targets suspicious accounts down to the micro-level By Nicholas Noe Looking back at the American-led response to the 9/11 attacks, it is difficult to find clear-cut successes tied to military intervention. Osama Bin Laden may have been killed, but his organization—and even more brutal successors like Daesh—has expanded. At the same time, the Taliban in Afghanistan are steadily fighting their way back to their former capital, Kabul, while post-invasion Iraq is shattered by extreme corruption and constant violence that has brought misery to millions of Iraqis and destabilized the wider region. One approach, however, has worked exceptionally well in fighting terrorism and pressuring opponents around the world: Weaponizing the global financial system by freezing assets and delinking states and institutions from the vital infrastructure of the global economy. Indeed, there is now widespread recognition (Read More)

Inside Cover

A New Age Is Upon Us

Governments are on a mission to adapt to a fast-paced world By Rabih Abouchakra and Michel Khoury The New Context…

Features

China’s “New Deal”

Beijing is reinventing globalization and the Gulf is taking note BY Mohamed Khashoggi “I would say to every nation on…

El Chapo’s Narco Mafia

What Mexico’s top drug lord has in common with Michael Corleone and Tony Soprano By Roberto Saviano A video showing…

Middle East: Blurred Lines

The Middle East and the never-ending game of partition BY Nour Samaha One hundred years ago in May, Sir Mark…

UAE: Eye on the Prize

A former champ faces an uphill battle for Dubai World Cup glory BY Martin Dokoupil At 6:30 a.m. on a…

Pakistan: The Shame Of It All

A new documentary on Pakistan’s honor killings brings truths home BY Mishaal Khan The medieval practice of honor killing is…

Down Time