February 3rd Issue

Somewhere They Belong

A lack of civic justice places bidoons at the bottom of Kuwait’s social ladder By ABDULLAH AL ELYAN Ali, not his real name, wakes up every day at dawn to pray and rush to the wholesale marketplace. He buy fresh produce with the little money he has, before touring the streets of Kuwait to sell them under a scorching summer sun or during an unforgiving winter, when the temperature drops to freezing levels. Ali’s perseverance in selling vegetables and fruits is admirable, to say the least. On a good day, he makes a profit of 10 Kuwaiti dinars, ($33), which does not happen often. But the harsh weather is the least of Ali’s concern. There are days when he needs to muster all of his energy and run, leaving behind his precious goods, when he sees a municipal vehicle or a police patrol approaching. Ali’s fear of being arrested and thrown in jail, is real, simply because he is a bidoon. Bidoon or ‘without’ is an Arabic word used in the region to describe those (Read More)

Inside Cover

Pakistan’s Polio Crisis

Children pay the price as ignorance and doubt help polio thrive in Pakistan  BY Mishaal Khan Pakistan is one of…

Features

A Taste from the Past

Gaza City’s traditional bakery flourishes amid electricity crisis BY Sami Abu Salem Columns of black and white smoke entwine in…

Yemen: Stairwell Lessons

Students are struggling to learn in the war-torn city of Taiz BY Nasser Al Sakkaf Schools in one of Yemen’s…

Countering Shame

Ayad Akhtar’s Disgraced failed to see that Muslims do have a robust tradition of talking back to their texts  …

Funding Humanity

By Leila Hatoum At a time when global powers are spending over $1.7 trillion annually on arms and military programs,…

Down Time

Reel Progress

Nahla Al Fahad’s take on the hijab has won critical acclaim BY Arfa Shahid In a conversation with Newsweek Middle East,…