Clinical Racism

Why some of the world’s most important medications don’t work for minorities BY Lindsey Konkel   Minutes separated Are’Yana Hill from death as she struggled to breathe in the hallway of her San Francisco high school. The 18-year-old had lived with asthma attacks since before she could talk, and on that day, in April 2014, she

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Of Hope, and of IVF

One woman’s story of her struggle to conceive BY Jumana Al-Darwish In solitude, I await my turn calmly. I am in a state of trance. I sit staring out of the blinds in my hospital room. There’s not much longer to go; in less than 20 minutes, the miracle of science will allow three embryos

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Arab Youth, Arab Fathers: H.E. Sheikh Nahyan on Parenting

An Arab father imparts his thoughts BY H.E. Sheikh Nahyan Bin Mubarak Al-Nahyan IN ALL CULTURES, fathers are important figures. In our region especially, children are expected to listen to their wisdom so that they may be guided toward more fulfilling lives. These days, I suspect that many a father in our region is uncertain about

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The Cradle Rocks the Vote

Umm al-Dunya, the “cradle of civilization” as the Middle East has it, heads to the ballot box By Safa Joudeh   Traffic flowed seamlessly through the streets of the middle-class Dokki district near Cairo on Monday evening.  The initial round of voting for Egypt’s first parliament in three years had come to an end in

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Palestine: A Third Intifada?

Jerusalem on the brink By Ben White It was just after midday on Oct. 5, 13-year-old Abd Al-Rahman Shadi Obeidallah was standing with friends in Aida refugee camp in Bethlehem. Young Palestinians had been throwing stones at the Israeli occupation forces stationed nearby when, without warning, a soldier fired two live bullets. Abd Al-Rahman was

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“This region is not on my agenda. It is my agenda.”

“It is a common mistake among some Arab leaders to listen to their own voice.” By: Mohammad Salman Iqbal/Leila Hatoum IN 2004, one man stood firm in urging Arab leaders to introduce reforms within their states. Memorably, he advised them to “change or you will be changed eventually.” Six years later, a wave of national uprisings

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To Uphold an Oath

In an age of refugees, upholding medical ethics is no mean feat By Nicholas Noe Kos, Greece—At its zenith, Kos had once revolutionized the field of medical ethics. Hippocrates and his disciples had bestowed the world with a lasting gift: the pledge to do no “harm or injustice” to those in need of care. To

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From Breakfast in Styrofoam to Styrofoam for Breakfast

To rid the world of plastic dishware, the worm’s the word By Stav Ziv More than 1 million tons of plastic foam cups and plates—most made of polystyrene resin—were discarded in the U.S. in 2013, says the Environmental Protection Agency, and the stuff can languish in landfills for many years. But there may be a

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Game of Isotopes: Are Iran’s prospects looking up?

A nuclear winter is (not) coming…just yet. Iran’s prospects are looking up By Roshanak Taghavi  LAST YEAR, the world of fantasy, much like reality, concerned itself often with the struggle for power: its use, abuse, and the mediation thereof. In the epic series Game of Thrones, petrified dragon eggs served as the weaponry of choice

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Pressing Matters: Media Coverage and the Arab Gulf States

Is the Western media biased in its reporting of Gulf affairs? By Sultan Sooud Al-Qassemi   Over the past few years Western media’s negative coverage of the Arab Gulf states has increased so much that it is starting to look more like a rite of passage for some journalists and news organisations. Meanwhile, what’s notable

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