May 18th Issue

The Egyptian Greetings From Tourism Board

Arbitrary detentions, torture, repression of the press and a failing economy have made Egypt a tinderbox By Janine di Giovanni Photographs by Vinciane Jacquet The day I arrived in Egypt in April, President Abdel-Fattah El Sisi had just given two Red Sea islands, Tiran and Sanafir, to King Salman of Saudi Arabia, who was visiting Cairo to announce billions of dollars in aid and investment. The islands are in the Gulf of Aqaba, where both Israel and Jordan maintain ports, so the transfer of the land was strategically important. It was also a baffling and highly contentious gift that angered many Egyptians. “Do we have any idea why he gave them, what his motivation was?” I asked Mohammed Zaree of the Cairo Institute for Human Rights Studies. He replied, “Good question. No one knows.” The next day, President Sisi gave a two-hour speech in which he defended his decision, saying the islands always belonged to Saudi Arabia, and prompted an u (Read More)

Inside Cover

Your Money Or Your Data

Ransomware viruses have been striking hospitals  and schools at an epidemic level BY Seung Lee The first wave of emotions,…

Features

Beyond The Pale

America’s Arab and South Asian activists are redefining whiteness BY Zahir Janmohamed In 1996, Stephen Holmes wrote a piece in…

Kuwait: Electronic Frontiers

Kuwait’s new electronic media law has draconian elements aimed at curbing freedom of speech, say online journalists BY Abdullah Al…

Muslim, Man Up?

We’re undergoing a crisis of Muslim masculinity. Looking away won’t help By Asma T. Uddin The image of the Muslim…

Down Time

Top Gun

The roof structure at Queen Alia’s airport in Amman proves that design and talent are alive and well in the…